Suze Adams

cropped-suze-adams_self-portrait.jpg

you can’t see me, 2015

(from the Within series of photographs)

 Continuing my exploration of the relationship between body and space through performance to camera, this project ‘frames’ my body in various settings carrying out unknown acts. Being photographed from behind is a deliberate strategy, a device to encourage the viewer to look into the space – but this is not an easy invitation: as I invite, I withdraw.

Animals think that if they cannot see you then you cannot see them. Like a cat who covers her eyes with her paws as she dozes (or even a small child who raises her hands to her eyes when spoken to), I have chosen to hide my face and eyes from others.

In these photographs I am deliberately diverting my gaze from the camera, instead I offer my back.

Is this rude?  Is this an act of disobedience or is it self-preservation and a desire for privacy?  How far do we have to conform to expected social roles before we threaten community cohesion?  Where is the divide between public and private?  How much expectation is there to adopt certain behaviour, to play to the gallery rather than to question the status quo through acts of withdrawal or social disobedience?

These provocative photographs prompt many questions and the Disobedient Art event has provided me with an opportunity to further explore and examine aspects of the project.  I have been considering issues of the body ‘out of place’, the withdrawn and/or awkward and what exactly disobedience means: is it necessarily antagonistic and aggressive or might it simply be a small gesture of resistance, a quiet and passive act?

Performance

Animals think that if they cannot see you then you cannot see them. Like a cat who covers her eyes with her paws as she dozes (or a small child who raises her hands to her eyes when spoken to), I have chosen to hide my face and eyes from others.

Is this rude?  Is this an act of disobedience or is it self-preservation and a desire for privacy?  How far is there a need to conform to expected social roles before community cohesion is threatened?

Where is the divide between public and private?  How much expectation is there to adopt certain behavior, to play to the gallery rather than to question the status quo through acts of withdrawal or social disobedience?

What exactly does disobedience mean: is it necessarily antagonistic and aggressive or might it simply be a small gesture of resistance, a quiet and passive act?

This will be an improvised performance responding to the gallery space, my images in the exhibition and my thinking on ‘disobedient art’.

Suze Adams Portrait

Suze Adams is an independent artist, lecturer and writer.

Underpinned by research and critical reflection, Adams’ practice focuses on the following themes: embodiment and multi-sensory experience; experiential time and memory; notions of home and inhabitation; and the space between interior and exterior landscapes. Via the selection of appropriate media, a corporeal practice is developed in tandem with conceptual understandings and translated into series and sequences of work.

Through works produced, Adams attempts to suggest something of the experiential landscape: emotive as well as more calculated responses – suggestions of the physical and psychological, the seen and the sensed.  Her artwork treads a delicate line between documentation and poetry and presents in the form of still and moving imagery, sound, text, performance and installation.

Adams exhibits regularly (nationally and internationally) and is an Associate Lecturer in Visual Culture (UWE, Bristol), a member of the Family Ties Network and an affiliate of PLaCE International Research Centre.

www.suzeadams.co.uk

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s